Concept of ‘home’ gives rise to artistic differences

Multiple ideas of domesticity quarrel or concur in exhibitions at Heiner Contemporary and the District of Columbia Arts Center. The Heiner show, “Housebound,” tends toward the cozily domestic, while the other, “A/way Home,” is rather less comfortable. But both include works that look at “home” from the outside.

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‘Art comes first’ in Tony Karman’s comeback story

C'mon — who doesn't love a good comeback story? Tony Karman gave us a great one when he launched Expo Chicago in September, a new and improved contemporary art fair that earned high marks for its visually sumptuous design, spacious exhibitor booths — which looked like art galleries, not cramped mall kiosks — and most important, for the impressive quality of the art on display. The former vice president and director of Art Chicago, Karman insisted "the art comes first," and it showed.

Lupe Fiasco a voice of reason amid the violence

For Lupe Fiasco, it was in some ways a heartbreaking year. In an interview last summer with MTV he broke down as he watched a 2006 video of himself and friends in his old West Side neighborhood, the laughter and easy camaraderie undercut by the realization that a number of those acquaintances were now dead, victims of gang violence.

Breakout puts author Gillian Flynn on the go, go, go

A year ago this time, Gillian Flynn was just another former Entertainment Weekly TV critic turned Chicago author of murder-mysteries who lived in the Ukrainian Village neighborhood and had already sold film rights to her first two novels ("Dark Places" and "Sharp Objects"). You know? C'mon, do something with yourself, sister! Then June arrived, and so did Flynn's blockbuster novel "Gone Girl."

What are we losing in the Web’s images of suffering and schadenfreude?

The picture arrived on the front page of the New York Post, ignited a firestorm of controversy and then faded within the usual two to three news cycles. It showed a dark-haired man in a light-green jacket, standing on the New York City subway tracks as a Q train approached. “Pushed on the subway track, this man is about to die,” read the headline, making it dreadfully clear that this was an image of death in action.

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