Dallas Contemporary announces major exhibition of Puerto Rican artist DZINE

DALLAS, TX.- Dallas Contemporary announces DZINE: Victory, the artist’s largest exhibition to date of newly commissioned work in mixed media and sculptural installation. DZINE combines his rich Puerto Rican culture with the universal desires for victory and recognition in two of the museum’s galleries. The exhibition runs from 19 January 2013 - 31 March 2013.. Chicago-based artist, DZINE, is a self-taught, mixed media artist who investigates Kustom Kulture and its relationship to art, sub cultures and the institution. His work (re)contextualizes these diverse elements to develop his own language. Infusing his trademark visual and audio language, the artist uses the sculptural and artistic form of lowriding as a platform to explore his emotional relationship with culture and beauty. His work addresses these issues through a lens of spirituality, beauty, desire, faith, folklore, and identity.

Tunisia jails 16 Islamists for one month over art violence

TUNIS (AFP).- A Tunisian court has handed one-month jail terms to 16 people implicated in violence last June linked to an art exhibit that was deemed offensive to Islam, official media reported on Wednesday. The defendants were convicted of violating the state of emergency, but were acquitted from the more serious charges, which included rebellion, assaulting public officials and attacks on public order by organised gangs, the TAP news agency quoted their lawyer Salaheddine Barakati as saying. Barakati added that several of his clients planned to file complaints against the state for holding them in preventative detention until November, when they were freed after a hunger strike by hardline Salafists in which two people died. At the end of December, four Tunisians being tried on the same charges were acquitted and three others sentenced to six months in prison, lawyer

Columbus Museum acquires twelve panels from Dawn Black’s Conceal Project

COLUMBUS, GA.- Cynthia-Reeves announced the Columbus Museum’s recent acquisition of twelve panels from Dawn Black’s Conceal Project — the artist’s magnum opus from the last several years. The acquisition comes out of Black’s current exhibition, also entitled The Conceal Project, on view through February 24 at the Columbus Museum in Columbus, Georgia. For the Museum’s permanent collection, curator Kristen Miller Zohn has selected examples of diverse vestments, uniforms, couture and masquerade – the many ways in which we hide or alter identity in contemporary culture. The cumulative impression of the installation, which features dozens of 7 x 5 inch discrete panels, imparts the ways in which people signal external identities – and intimates, as well, an obscured or protected interior identity. Black’s process results in a visual exploration of diverse cultural semiotics, from

Digital age prompting closure of base theaters

By: Dirk Lemmers, Associated Press ELLSWORTH AIR FORCE BASE (AP).- Stacey Darling loves watching family movies at the Ellsworth Air Force Base theater in South Dakota because it's so much more affordable than taking her three children to the multiplex in nearby Rapid City. Darling, whose husband is an airman, has been catching second-run films on base for about 2 1/2 years, and was there Saturday for the theater's last showing — a screening of the animated movie "Hotel Transylvania." The movie theater is among 60 around the globe run by the Army and Air Force Exchange Service that is screening its last picture show amid the industry's conversion to digital projection. "We always come out for the cartoons," said Darling,

With 1,200 newly installed lamps, new Empire State Building spire dazzles rivals

NEW YORK (AFP).- When owner Anthony Malkin found his Empire State Building's dominance of the New York skyline under attack, he turned to Hong Kong for an idea that could dazzle any rival into submission: light. The 1,200 newly installed lamps now illuminating the skyscraper's famous spire have brought the most visible change to the Art-Deco building since it was raised over Manhattan at the start of the Great Depression. The spire -- the same one that King Kong climbed in the black and white 1933 movie -- had been lit up in some manner since 1956, with colors introduced in 1976. In a nightly city tradition, New Yorkers would find the spire either in standard white or honoring some special event: blue and white when the Yankees win the Baseball World Series, red and green for Christmas, green for Saint Patrick's Day, and so on. But the huge, inefficient lamps installed

Nation honors King on day of Obama inauguration

By: Kate Brumback, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP).- Commemorative events for the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. slid seamlessly into celebrations of the swearing-in Monday of the nation's first black president, with many Americans moved by the reminder of how far the country has come since the 1960s. "This is the dream that Dr. King talked about in his speech. We see history in the making," said Joyce Oliver, who observed King Day by visiting the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., built on the site of the old Lorraine Motel, where King was assassinated in 1968. In Atlanta, at the 45th annual service for the civil rights leader at the church where he was pastor, those gathered in the sanctuary were invited to stay to watch President Barack Obama's second inauguration on a big-screen

Pennsylvania ‘dwarf’ clock whistles while it works the crowd at Stephenson’s New Year’s auction

SOUTHAMPTON, PA.- Good things came in small packages at Stephenson’s Jan. 1 auction in suburban Philadelphia. An early 19th-century Henry Bower “dwarf” clock standing only 50 inches tall rang in the New Year in fine style, leading prices realized with a buoyant selling price of $31,625. All prices quoted include 15% buyer’s premium. The diminutive walnut clock sourced from an estate in Pennsylvania’s Poconos region gave indications early on that it might be a sizzler on auction day. “You can tell a lot by what goes on during the preview,” said Cindy Stephenson, owner of Stephenson’s Auctioneers. “All of the top clock people were here looking at it. One expert spent half an hour inspecting it. Another customer pulled out an old clock book that explained the meaning of ‘Feste Swome,’ which was written on the clock. Feste Swome is Pennsylvania German for ‘Falk

Human Rights is the focus of four exhibitions at the Ryerson Image Centre

TORONTO.- Four new exhibitions at the Ryerson Image Centre address human rights and further the thought-provoking curatorial vision of director Doina Popescu. HUMAN RIGHTS HUMAN WRONGS; Alfredo Jaar: The Politics of Images; Clive Holden: UNAMERICAN UNFAMOUS; and Dominic Nahr: Captive State open on Wednesday January 23, 2013. Featuring 316 original prints from the prestigious Black Star Collection, HUMAN RIGHTS HUMAN WRONGS uses the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a point of departure to examine whether images of political struggle, suffering and victims of violence work for or against humanitarian objectives, especially when considering questions of race, representation, ethical responsibility and the cultural position of the photographer. Curated by Mark Sealy, Director of Autograph ABP in London, England, and named

£20 picture turns out to be £60,000 power print by Cyril Edward Power for sale at Bonhams

LONDON.- A print of a speeding racing car that hung on a man’s wall for 25 years, unregarded as anything other than a nice image, was shown to a Bonhams auctioneer who advised the client that it was very valuable. Now it will be sold in Bonhams Print sale on April 16th in London for an estimated £40,000 to £60,000. Toby Wilson, Head of Automobilia at Bonhams, passed the print to Rupert Worrall the Head of Prints at Bonhams who confirmed Toby’s belief that this was something special, way beyond the £20 value its owner had placed on it when showing it to Toby to get his opinion. Toby says: “I was attending the Automobilia Exhibition at Seaside California during the Pebble Beach week, when I was approached by a private client who had found 'This old print that had been hanging in his garage for 25 years' and asked "If I liked it"? He believed it was worth no more than £20. I identified the print as much more valuab