Civil Rights Movement (1954-68)

Nonfiction: Moving Alabama Into the Modern Age

Doug Jones’s “Bending Toward Justice” is about his role in the famous 1963 church-bombing case and his experience running for senator in 2017.

Nonfiction: The Black Sergeant and the White Judge Who Changed Civil Rights History

“Unexampled Courage,” by Richard Gergel, is a riveting account of the 1946 legal case that spurred the federal government to act in defense of racial equality.

Critic’s Notebook: James Baldwin: Pessimist, Optimist, Hero

The literary figure is the glowing subject of a group exhibition, curated by the New Yorker critic Hilton Als, that is part personal narrative, part study of his influence on contemporary artists.

Critic’s Notebook: James Baldwin: Pessimist, Optimist, Hero

The literary figure is the glowing subject of a group exhibition, curated by the New Yorker critic Hilton Als, that is part personal narrative, part study of his influence on contemporary artists.

Newsbook: Remembering Martin Luther King Jr.

Seven books present a nuanced view of this giant’s legacy in modern American civil rights.

Profile: A South Carolina Judge Writes a Book About a Predecessor, an Unsung Giant of Civil Rights Law

When Richard Gergel was assigned to the same courtroom as J. Waties Waring, he vowed to ensure that, as Martin Luther King Jr. said, Waring would “long be remembered.”

Nonfiction: The Civil Rights Movement Photographer Who Was Also an F.B.I. Informant

“Bluff City,” by Preston Lauterbach, delves into the double life of Ernest Withers, one of the era’s great documentarians.