dance

Why We Need Older Dancers

I wanted to work with dancers I didn’t have to explain myself to as I might have to with younger performers. At the same time, I sensed this might provide a reflection of the “aging” general audience and public at large. I’ve received feedback that what I’m doing is “political,” that I’m “influencing perception, changing bias, working outside the norm.” Personally, I’m just working. And intend to keep doing so.

Why We Need Older Dancers

I wanted to work with dancers I didn’t have to explain myself to as I might have to with younger performers. At the same time, I sensed this might provide a reflection of the “aging” general audience and public at large. I’ve received feedback that what I’m doing is “political,” that I’m “influencing perception, changing bias, working outside the norm.” Personally, I’m just working. And intend to keep doing so.

The Woman Who Rescued Ballet British Columbia

When she sits down to talk, Emily Molnar begins by remembering one of her first acts as Ballet BC’s artistic director: brainstorming with the dancers about how to go forward with a shared vision. It was a bold way to launch the changing of the guard—one that stressed values of trust, support, and collaboration. The fact that it took place in a boardroom, instead of sprawled on the floor in the more familiar studio environment, was significant. It meant they sat as equals around a table, where the baggage of ballet hierarchy—in which dancers have traditionally not been encouraged to speak up—could be more easily left behind.

The Choreographer Shaking Things Up (In A Good Way) At City Ballet

Kyle Abraham feels like a ballet outsider – after all, he’s known for his work in modern dance. But he also feels the pressure of representation: “He is the first black artist in more than a decade to create a new work for the company, and just the seventh in its 70-year history. (In a repertory with more than 400 ballets, just 10 are credited or co-credited to black choreographers.)”

Belgium Investigates Another Ballet Abuse Scandal

Jan Fabre has all kinds of awards, honors, and money from the Belgian government, and he’s renowned for being a “boundary pusher” in dance. Perhaps some of those boundaries should have been left alone: “Eight former members of Mr. Fabre’s company signed an open letter to the magazine Rekto Verso accusing him of sexual harassment. The letter said 12 current or former members had also endorsed it anonymously. Mr. Fabre ran a company where ‘humiliation is daily bread,’ it said. The signees also accused Mr. Fabre of running a semi-secret project in which dancers were pressured to pose for provocative photos in exchange for off-the-books payments.”

NYT Dance Critic Alastair Macaulay To Retire

For some time now, Alastair — who celebrated 40 years of reviewing this May — has wanted to spend more time in Britain, his home country; scale back on his daily reviewing responsibilities; and work on a variety of projects, including teaching and lecturing at Juilliard, the 92 Street Y and City Center, and a research fellowship with the Center for Ballet and the Arts.