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Rachel Ingalls, Author Of ‘Mrs. Caliban’, Dead At 78

The daughter of a Harvard Sanskrit professor, Ingalls settled in England as a young adult “and began to publish short stories; her editor at Faber’s, Charles Monteith, said she was ‘a genius – not a word I use lightly’. In 1982 she published her masterpiece, Mrs Caliban, the tale of an unhappy housewife who gives shelter – and more – to a handsome sea creature who has escaped from a research institute. … [The novel,] largely ignored at the time, was republished in 2017 to huge acclaim and she was rediscovered in her late seventies.” – The Telegraph (UK)

J.H. Kwabena Nketia, Father Of African Musicology, Dead At 97

“In a career stretching back to the 1950s and continuing into his 90s, Dr. Nketia wrote hundreds of articles and books in English and Twi, a Ghanaian language, on topics ranging from music theory to folklore, as well as scores of compositions. … His 1974 book, The Music of Africa, is widely considered a definitive historical study, and Ethnomusicology and African Music, a collection of his writings published in 2005, is used in classrooms throughout Africa and across the world. – The New York Times

Dick Dale, ‘King Of The Surf Guitar’, Dead At 81

“In the space of a few short years, the Boston-born, Southern California transplant (born Richard Anthony Monsour) had merged the laid-back, sun-blasted lifestyle of the surf scene with a blistering rhythm of rockabilly and early rock-and-roll. As the mad scientist behind what was dubbed ‘surf rock,’ Dale was, in the words of a 1963 Life magazine profile, a ‘thumping teenage idol who is part evangelist, part Pied Piper and all success.'” – The Washington Post

Marjorie Weinman Sharmat, The Author Of ‘Nate The Great,’ Has Died At 90

Sharmat was the author of more than 130 books, but the Nate the Great series – inspired by her love for detective stories and her dislike of boring children’s books – was her most well-known. “Once she started being published, [her son Andrew] said, there was no stopping her. ‘It was like she was launched into the stratosphere,’ he said. ‘She loved it.'” – The New York Times